Intuit Android Tablet App

The Intuit Financial Services (IFS) group hired me as a UX consultant to create the interaction design for an Android tablet version of their online banking application. The customers were small banks without in-house Android development expertise. At the time, Intuit already had an iPad version of their app, however, the work was outsourced and there were some concerns around its design.

The project took place over a 5-month period and included myself, a visual designer and a user researcher.

Research

In this initial project phase, in addition to requirements gathering, I reviewed the following:

  • Existing internal & external research (e.g., Banking Segmentation Study, iPad Prototype research)
  • UX of Intuit's current offering
  • UX of competitors & related products
  • Android OS guidelines with an emphasis on tablets

All of my research findings were bundled up into a presentation for the cross-functional team. In addition to summarizing the content above, I recommended the following guiding design principles.

  • Make me smarter. Empower me to discover what I don't know. 
  • Make me more efficient. Help me quickly scan for important info.  Don't make me hunt for it.
  • Make banking fun! Make the content more interactive & engaging.

Concept

The scope of my work covered all aspects of the banking application: Navigation, Accounts, Transactions, Bill Pay, Transfers, Contact Us, Locations, Check Deposit and Peer-to-Peer Transfers. For the sake of brevity, I will share the design process for the Navigation and Accounts aspects of the work. If we meet in person, I'm happy to review the other content.  Below are four early concepts I prepared for the team to review.

The Overview (Dashboard approach)

The Overview (Dashboard approach)

The Traditionalist (List style)

The Traditionalist (List style)

The Minimalist (Simple summary at top)

The Minimalist (Simple summary at top)

The Minimalist (With alternate navigation)

The Minimalist (With alternate navigation)

Refined Design

After reviewing the designs internally, concerns were raised around the real estate required to display the accounts on the left hand side. Additionally, while the action text labels were clear, we could only display a few options and far too many ended up in the overflow menu. I refined the navigation design further and incorporated the Accounts page content. After many different iterations we arrived at the general direction shown below.

Usability Testing

Before finalizing design the team was committed to conducting user research with prospective end users. The research surfaced some design issues which were quickly corrected but it also reinforced what aspects of the designs were working well. A few highlights:

  • Some users expected touch interactions which were not available, e.g., to reorder accounts.
  • Some found the navigation icons confusing, e.g., transfer looks like "recycling."
  • Participants liked the extra account information below the account number, "Everything is right there for me!"
  • One user cited that they would probably go to Google Maps rather than using the Location feature.
  • Two users wanted the app to remember the last view selected (grid vs. list).

Visual Design

Once the team was in strong agreement on the navigation and interaction design direction, the visual designer experimented with different "skins" for the app. Since it was a white label solution the banks would be able to add their own logo and choose different colors and font treatments.